Knee Cah Joe

It sounds like my Indian name doesn't it?  However in this case it means wrist locks.  Or maybe joint locks, but last night it was all about wrist locks.  Thankfully Noah was able to tell me it was Nikajo or Nikkyo. 

I'm very proud of my locks.  My old school took great lengths to train us to be able to apply them in a variety of forms and angles and yet I find myself being educated in news ways with Reed Sensei.  Usually a lock is applied by capturing your opponents hands against something.  In this case they have grabbed you by the wrist.  We use our other hand to hold it in place and then angle the wrist so the pressure goes against the joint in some horrific way.  

One thing I don't recall working on was escapes and counters.  We worked so hard on setting up and getting into position that I don't think it ever came up. The two big ones are getting super close to the other guy and getting so far out that the leverage is ruined.  I could feel that rush of understanding and being surprised that I could still be surprised.

The big treat last night was that Mark and I switched places in the application series and got about halfway through the routine.  That was a kick in the pants because it went so fast.  I'm still worried about my attention to detail.  So many little things to worry about.

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My Indian name
a short story by the Tater

I used to work with Troy.  He's a Cowlitz Indian.  I was fascinated by his stories of dysfunctional tribal politics combined with a traditional thread tying his life together while frustrating him at the same time.  

I told him that I had been frustrated by my inability to track down my Lene-Lenape ancestry (this was before cheap DNA tests).  As a consequence I was robbed of ever getting an Indian name.  

He approached his grandfather one weekend to see if they could help me out. As as result I got the name Piah Kiah Ootlach.  It means Burns In The Sun.  

Comments

Noah said…
If it helps your research, I believe you're talking about "nikajo," which is a wrist lock commonly associated with Aikido and Japanese jujutsu, although it's present in tons of systems. Aikido people also call it "nikkyo"
Potatoe Fist said…
Noah, thank god you read the blog! I was so frustrated trying to remember that name. I didn't have a chance to write it down - I should have typed it into my phone. I'll correct the post a bit. Thanks for paying attention.

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